<

Celebrate!

Though the new cycle of Israel's feasts has concluded, I'd like to share one more observation about last week's high holy day, Yom Kippur. It is a day on which adults are afflicting themselves by fasting, abstaining from all pleasures, and repenting. But for the children, Yom Kippur is a very different holiday. This day is my son Obi's favorite holiday! Why? Because the kids are not fasting or recalling their sins or suffering at all – they are celebrating freedom!

...continue reading this devotion.

May Your Sins be Removed as Far as the East and the West!

Yesterday, I began to touch on the significance of "rachamim", the mercies of God. The scripture expressed that our sins are removed as far as "the east is from the west" -- meaning they are completely forgiven when confessed. On the feast of Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement two goats are involved in the sacrifice.

...continue reading this devotion.

We're in the midst of Awesome Days!

Between Rosh HaShannah and Yom Kippur are ten days. These days are known as "Yamim Noraim", "the Days of Awe" -- or also translated, the "Awesome days". In Judaism it has been long believed that these days seal your fate for the upcoming year -- and also allude to your final destiny, concerning whether your name continues to be written in the Book of Life.

...continue reading this devotion.

The Lord Himself Provided!

One of the major themes of Rosh Hashana is called Akedat Yitzchak, which means the Binding of Isaac. According to Jewish tradition, God told Abraham that the ram's horn – otherwise known as a shofar – should be blown on Rosh Hashana to remind people of the sacrifice that God provided Himself when Abraham was about to offer Isaac on Mount Moriah.

...continue reading this devotion.

Approach the Season for Repentance!

The Hebrew calendar month of Elul began on Saturday night. Each day during the month of Elul, a shofar blast is sounded to announce the coming month of Tishrei – wherein the festival of Yom Teruah – the feast of trumpets-- takes place, calling for all people to repent. Elul, therefore, is identified as a month during which a serious emphasis is placed on personal self-examination and repentance, an end-of-the-year opportunity to set our lives in order before Yom Teruah (Rosh Hashana), the Days of Awe, and finally, Yom Kippur.

...continue reading this devotion.