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You're in the midst of the Days of Awe!

From Rosh HaShanah to Yom Kippur there are ten days. The Lord gave these days to Israel to prepare for His judgment. They became known as the Yamim Noraim – the "Days of Awe". It has been long believed that during these days one's final destiny was sealed concerning the Book of Life, God's eternal Book of Judgment. Thus every year the Jewish people have observed these days with great reverence and repentance so to be right with God and with men.

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Sound the alarm!

When we see the word trumpet in the Bible, the Hebrew equivalent is "shofar". Shofars are those twisty brown ram's horns that have recently become quite the popular Christian decor. Well, forget decor -- we need to learn how to blow those things!! All around the world this season, the shofar is being blown among Jewish communities. While for most Jewish people today, it is tradition to hear the shofar blast, few know of Yeshua's (Jesus') soon return.

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What is that awful smell?!

As we celebrated Yom Teruah (Feast of Trumpets) and are in the midst of "Yamin Noraim" or the days of awe, the days between the Feast of Trumpets and Yom Kippur, it is the season of repentance.

This is the season that the shofar (rams horn) is blown to heed the call of warning to repent from our sins and be clean. The shofar's unique sounding blast is a wake-up call to all who will hear.

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Crown Your Mind!

The high priest of Ancient Israel wore a crown of pure gold on his head called a Nezer, which comes from the word “nazar”. This word "nazar" means to dedicate, consecrate and sacredly separate. The word “nazarite” comes from this root, and describes someone who has taken a vow to be separated from the world.

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Cast Your Bread Upon the Waters!

One of the more beautiful ceremonies of the Jewish faith is called "Tashlich". Tashlich means to cast away. Every year between Rosh haShana and Yom Kippur, Jewish people around the world journey to a nearby river or stream and cast in bread crumbs as they confess their sins. As the bread crumbs are swept downstream soon to be out of sight, so they believe God will sweep away their sins.

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Spread the good news in power!

One of the greatest moves of God took place in 1727 on the estate of Count Zinzendorf. Count Zinzendorf was a strong believer who was deeply influenced by the faith of his grandmother and aunt. At the tender age of 22, he opened a portion of his estate to refugees seeking asylum from the religious persecution throughout Europe.

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